Report shows research collaboration between UK and EU strengthens medical co-operation


A new report titled 'The role of the UK in creating value to EU Science and health', has shown that collaborations between medical researchers from the UK and the European Union (EU) have increased the value of research and benefitted patients across Europe.

The report has been commissioned by eight UK-based medical organisations, including Cancer Research UK, the British Heart Foundation, the Medical Research Council, Arthritis Research UK, MQ: Transforming Mental Health, Association of Medical Research Charities, Wellcome and the Academy of Medical Sciences.

The new study shows how the UK’s contribution to research throughout the EU has both nurtured and strengthened scientific co-operation.

Collaboration between the researchers has supported clinical trials, particularly the ones conducted for rarer diseases where the UK leads the highest number of trials.

Cancer Research UK chief executive Harpal Kumar said: “As the UK and the EU enter into negotiations to determine the new relationship it’s vital that ensuring collaborations between medical researchers across Europe continue is a priority.

“By creating an environment that allows the best minds to work together, wherever they are, we will accelerate the life-saving discoveries that will help people across Europe.”

"By creating an environment that allows the best minds to work together, wherever they are, we will accelerate the life-saving discoveries that will help people across Europe."

The report also highlights that the researchers from the UK accounted for 17% of the membership of the Scientific Advisory Boards at Germany’s Max Planck Institutes. This is believed to be the highest proportion from one country.

Several experts from across Europe have placed emphasis on the country’s ability to conduct translational research that supports the discovery of new treatments and devices beneficial for patients throughout the continent.

The new treatments also include the development of new and advanced genetically targeted personalised medicines through to interventions for well-being and mental health.

The report also says that the UK performs the significant role of a trainer of scientists, where approximately 16,000 students in the EU study several biomedical courses at higher education institutes across the country.


Image: Collaboration between researchers from UK and EU boosts life-saving medical discoveries. Photo: courtesy of Cancer Research UK.