SMC approves Amgen’s carfilzomib for multiple myeloma treatment


The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has approved the routine use of Amgen’s carfilzomib (Kyprolis), in combination with dexamethasone, for the treatment of multiple myeloma across National Health Service (NHS) Scotland.

Multiple myeloma is an incurable and complex cancer of the blood cells that originates in bone marrow.

Carfilzomib is considered through SMC’s Patient and Clinician Engagement (PACE) process for treatments used for very rare conditions, and will be made available in combination with dexamethasone to myeloma patients who have received at least one prior treatment.

The treatment can help increase overall survival and progression-free survival compared to other available treatment options.

Commenting on the SMC approval for carfilzomib, Myeloma UK policy and public affairs officer Shelagh McKinlay said: “This is great news for myeloma patients in Scotland. Today’s approval gives myeloma patients whose cancer has come back an important new treatment option.

“Having a range of effective options is especially vital in myeloma because it is such an individual cancer and becomes resistant to treatment.

"We played a key role in helping the SMC to reach its positive decision by ensuring that the patient and carer voice was heard in the process."

“We played a key role in helping the SMC to reach its positive decision by ensuring that the patient and carer voice was heard in the process.”

In June, NICE granted approval for the use of carfilzomib in combination with dexamethasone to treat myeloma patients on the NHS in England and Wales.

SMC has also approved AbbVie’s venclyxto (venetoclax) for use across NHS Scotland to treat adult patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL).

Venclyxto can be administered in CLL patients in the absence of 17p deletion or TP53 mutation who have failed both chemo-immunotherapy and a B-cell receptor (BCR) inhibitor, as well as who are either unsuitable for or have failed a BCR inhibitor.


Image: Bone marrow aspirate showing the histologic correlate of multiple myeloma under the microscope. Photo: courtesy of Wikipedia / KGH.