UK 15-year-old develops new test for Alzheimer’s disease

13 July 2015 (Last Updated July 13th, 2015 18:30)

Teenager Krtin Nithiyanandam from Surrey, UK, has developed a new test with the potential for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

Alzheimer

Teenager Krtin Nithiyanandam from Surrey, UK, has developed a new test with the potential for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s is a chronic neurodegenerative disease and its early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events (short-term memory loss).

Krtin’s new test was presented to the Google Science Fair Prize to help diagnose of Alzheimer’s ten years before the first symptoms appear, reported The Telegraph.

The molecular ‘Trojan Horse’ that Krtin has developed could potentially be used for non-invasive imaging and show significant promise for the earlier, minimally-invasive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, according to Krtin’s project report.

He has also conjugated a bispecific antibody (BsAb) to selective wavelength quantum dots (QDs) to create a diagnostic probe with promising affinities which can be non-invasively detected using fNIR Spectroscopy.

"This early diagnosis could help families prepare for the future and ensure that existing drugs are used to better effect."

The probe had a low affinity to transferrin receptors (TfRs), potentially allowing it to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) through receptor mediated transytosis.

Krtin was quoted by the news publication as saying: "The main benefits of my test are that it could be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms start to show by focusing on pathophysiological changes, some of which can occur a decade before symptoms are prevalent.

"This early diagnosis could help families prepare for the future and ensure that existing drugs are used to better effect."

Google Science Fair marketing lead Andrea Cohan was quoted as saying: "We want to support and foster the next generation of scientists and engineers. The UK has once again proven itself as a hotbed of science creation."


Image: PET scan of a human brain suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Photo: courtesy of US National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Centre.