Cancer Research UK invests in studying cancers with low survival rates

12 May 2016 (Last Updated May 12th, 2016 18:30)

Cancer Research UK is making a £16m investment in four UK-wide collaborations, in a bid to welcome new researches to understand and treat cancers with low survival rates.

Cancer Research UK is making a £16m investment in four UK-wide collaborations, in a bid to welcome new researches to understand and treat cancers with low survival rates.

The Centres' Network Accelerator Awards provide infrastructural support to several research centres and are investing the amount in research over the next five years.

Cancer Research UK Research Funding executive director Dr Iain Foulkes said: "It's really exciting that we're investing in these innovative and collaborative research projects across the UK.

"We were really impressed by how the researchers have united their expertise to provide an extra boost to tackle cancers that are hard to treat, like brain and lung cancer."

"The research will help with understanding the evolution, as well as the final stages of cancer, along with studying the genetics of brain tumours."

The Cancer Research UK University College London (UCL) Centre will receive £4m of the total investment to start a national post-mortem tissue bank from patients who are afflicted with hard to treat and metastatic cancer.

The research will help with understanding the evolution, as well as the final stages of cancer, along with studying the genetics of brain tumours, which are difficult for doctors to take samples from when patients are alive.

These samples will enable scientists to understand the growth and progress of tumours and the reaction on the patient's body during the final stages of the disease.

Additionally, this will allow them to learn how and why tumours become resistant to treatment, along with finding measures to strengthen the immune system of the body to fight the disease in the future.

The Cancer Research UK Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) Centre will receive more than £4m to find the best way to provide three advanced radiotherapy techniques to patients with hard to treat oesophageal and lung cancer.

The grant will not only be used to train experts but also to determine the best ways to deliver image-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and proton beam therapy to patients.

The Southampton Centre will receive about £4m in funding to investigate the ways tumours respond to immunotherapy.

Scientists will use the funding to investigate new ways to use the power of immunotherapy for the treatment of lung and oesophageal cancers, both of which have poor survival rates.

The Edinburgh Centre will also receive approximately £4m that will be used to focus on the most common form of brain tumours and establish a crucial research resource.

Samples of brain tumour from patients will be taken during surgery and then these cells will be grown in the lab to study the faulty molecules that cause the disease, helping to discover better ways to diagnose and treat brain cancer.