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October 20, 2016

Elsevier selects four start-up companies for The Hive incubator project

Elsevier has selected four start-up companies for its new incubator project, The Hive, for biotech and pharmaceutical start-up firms.

By Srivari Aishwarya

Elsevier has selected four start-up companies for its new incubator project, The Hive, for biotech and pharmaceutical start-up firms.

Arctic Pharma, Rubius Therapeutics, Myelo Therapeutics and Reset Therapeutics are part of The Hive.

The companies taking part in the project will have access to Elsevier's information solutions to accelerate research in early drug discovery and development.

Elsevier R&D Solutions managing director Alexander Van Boetzelaer said: "The goals of The Hive are to highlight the incredible innovation taking place in the pharmaceutical and biotech space and the important role that small biotech start-ups play in the origin of drug discoveries.

"The four companies we selected for The Hive are exceptional examples of the kind of cutting-edge research that is happening in the industry."

"The four companies we selected for The Hive are exceptional examples of the kind of cutting-edge research that is happening in the industry.

"We believe that each one has the potential to drive successful pharmaceutical outcomes and improve the lives of patients. We are delighted to welcome these four companies to The Hive and look forward to sharing their stories."

All four companies have demonstrated their commitment to address areas of high needs in therapeutics.

Arctic Pharma is developing new drugs to combat cancer, while Rubius Therapeutics is involved in the development of Red-Cell Therapeutics, which have the potential to treat a variety of diseases such as rare genetic disorders, metabolic conditions, cancer, autoimmune and infectious diseases.

Additionally, Myelo Therapeutics is developing Myelo001, which is an orally applied small molecule with an ability to reduce the occurrence of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), a side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy that can delay treatment.

Reset Therapeutics said it is developing first-in-class approaches to treating diseases by restoring the body's natural 24-hour, or circadian, rhythms.

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