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October 2, 2016

New 3D-printed human torso could transform radiotherapy development

A team of researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust have developed a new 3D-printed human torso, which could transform radiotherapy development.

By Srivari Aishwarya

A team of researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust have developed a new 3D-printed human torso, which could transform radiotherapy development.

The new AbdoMan has been created to replicate the uptake of radioactivity within the abdomen of a human patient.

This torso is filled with a radioactive solution and will be able to replicate the amount of radiation distributed in tumours and normal tissue within a body organ, such as the liver.

It also facilitates the creation of images that simulate the distribution of the radiation doses delivered by internal forms of radiotherapy.

"Our 3D-printed human torso could transform the development of new forms of radiotherapy by allowing us to safely and reliably improve radiation dosing."

Institute of Cancer Research joint department of physics clinical scientist Dr Jonathan Gear said: “Our 3D-printed human torso could transform the development of new forms of radiotherapy by allowing us to safely and reliably improve radiation dosing.

“It’s already being used to measure how much radiation is being delivered to tumour models using state-of-the-art imaging techniques, and this will help to assess the effects of molecular radiotherapies in patients undergoing clinical trials.”

Researchers at the University of Oxford, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Sirtex Medical will use AbdoMan to model radiation doses from Y-90 resin microspheres.

Sirtex Medical-built microspheres, containing radioactive Yttrium, are used to deliver radiation directly to liver tumours.

This internal radiation therapy involves doctors administering unstable molecules into a tumour by exposing cancer cells to high doses of radiation, while the radioactivity undergoes decay.

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