New report says leukaemia has largest active development pipeline

22 June 2016 (Last Updated June 22nd, 2016 18:30)

Leukaemia has the largest pipeline in active development from the three major indications within haematological cancer, also comprising lymphoma and myeloma, according to a new report by GBI Research.

Leukaemia has the largest pipeline in active development from the three major indications within haematological cancer, also comprising lymphoma and myeloma, according to a new report by GBI Research.

Named 'Frontier Pharma: Hematological Cancers - Highly Innovative Pipeline Continues Trend towards Targeted, Patient-Specific Therapies', the report reveals that currently there are 1,234 pipeline products in active development in the haematological cancer therapy area.

Leukaemia has 798 products in active development, while lymphoma and myeloma have 552 and 396 respectively.

GBI Research senior analyst Yasser Mushtaq said: "Leukaemia has the most products in the haematological cancers pipeline, with 349 in clinical development and 446 in early stage development, while three products had an undisclosed stage of development.

"It is notable that Phase II also contains many products for leukaemia and lymphoma, which is a promising trend for product development."

"In terms of individual stages, however, Preclinical is the largest across leukaemia and lymphoma, while Phase II is the largest in myeloma. It is notable that Phase II also contains many products for leukaemia and lymphoma, which is a promising trend for product development.

"The leukaemia indication contains the most first-in-class products, with 195, while the lymphoma and myeloma pipelines contain 186 and 82 first-in-class products respectively."

The report also states that significant unmet needs remain in haematological cancer, with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) particularly ill-served, as there is a necessity for more efficacious targeted therapies across all patient subtypes.

Currently, treatment of AML is still limited to conventional DNA-targeted chemotherapy regimens, which achieve long-term survival rates of 25%-50% in patients under 60 years old, and only 5%-15% in older patients, highlighting an urgent need for more efficacious treatments.

The report provides analysis of the haematological cancers treatment pipeline, which is stratified by stage of development, molecule type and molecular target.