AstraZeneca has announced that National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published a Final Appraisal Determination (FAD) recommending 60mg of ticagrelor with aspirin for anti-clotting treatment.

This treatment will prevent atherothrombotic events in adults who have experienced myocardial infarction and are at high risk of a further event.

Treatment should be stopped after clinical indication or at a maximum of three years.

A patient can be considered high-risk if they are above 65, suffering from diabetes mellitus or a second prior MI of at least one year. Patients will also be categorised as high risks if there is evidence of multi-vessel coronary artery disease or chronic non-end-stage renal dysfunction.

"Today’s NICE recommendation is an important step forward in enabling us as clinicians to continue reducing patients’ risk of a further atherothrombotic event."

University of Sheffield professor of cardiology Professor Rob Storey said: “Secondary prevention for heart attack patients is critically important for their physical and psychological wellbeing.

“Today’s NICE recommendation is an important step forward in enabling us as clinicians to continue reducing patients’ risk of a further atherothrombotic event, including another heart attack or stroke, in the first few years following an initial heart attack.”

Previously, 90mg of Ticagrelor with low dose aspirin combination was recommended by NICE and the Scottish Medicines Consortium as a treatment option for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adults with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) for only 12 months.

The latest recommendation ensures that in future patients within NHS England and Wales with a long history of heart attack and a high risk of another event can continue with 60mg of ticagrelor twice-daily with aspirin for a maximum of three years or before as per requirement.

AstraZeneca UK and Ireland country president Lisa Anson said: “We welcome this very important and positive recommendation by NICE.

"With more people than ever surviving heart attacks, it is critical to recognise the need to provide ongoing management of the underlying condition in the immediate years following an attack for the prevention of further events.

“At AstraZeneca we are committed to helping appropriate NHS patients who could benefit from 60mg of ticagrelor get access to the treatment.”

After the publication of final Technology Appraisal Guidance for 60mg of ticagrelor by NICE, the treatment may be funded and accessible on the NHS within 90 days.

Some common adverse events associated with ticagrelor are shortness of breath, a high level of uric acid in the blood and bleeding caused by blood disorders.