Domain Therapeutics signs GPCR licensing agreement with Alkermes


Biopharmaceutical company Domain Therapeutics has signed a licensing agreement for its G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) BioSens-All technology with Ireland-based Alkermes.

Under the agreement, Alkermes is entitled to use the technology as part of its drug discovery efforts.

Domain Therapeutics CEO Pascal Neuville said: “We are very pleased to grant the first of a limited series of non-exclusive licences for our BioSens-All technology. It is a further validation of the power of this technology that is designed to increase the success rate of drug discovery.

“With additional validation from our ongoing relationships with several pharmaceutical partners, we believe that BioSens-All is a key platform for improved candidate identification and reduced early stage attrition.”

Developed by a team of researchers from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) at the Université de Montréal, the BioSens-All technology generates and analyses signalling data on GPCR drug candidates.

"With both screening and characterisation applications, we believe this technology will be a valuable tool in our discovery efforts."

Commercialisation rights to the technology were acquired by Domain Therapeutics through two licensing agreements signed in 2013 and 2016.

Alkermes research, pharmaceutical and non-clinical development senior vice-president Mark Namchuk said: “With both screening and characterisation applications, we believe this technology will be a valuable tool in our discovery efforts.”

By monitoring several signalling pathways in living cells, parallel assays and a homogeneous format, BioSens-All allows the link to be made between specific signalling signatures of drug candidates and their biological effects.

It also allows the understanding of signalling pathways activated by each candidate molecule and predict its pharmacological profile.

With this approach, the molecules that have the potential of being active without presenting side effects or inducing tolerance to treatment can be selected at an early stage.