Lilly and KeyBioscience collaborate to develop potential type 2 diabetes treatment


US-based Eli Lilly and Company has collaborated with Nordic Bioscience subsidiary KeyBioscience to develop Dual Amylin Calcitonin Receptor Agonists (DACRAs), a potential new class of treatments for patients with metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes.

The partnership involves access to the DACRA platform with multiple molecules, including KBP-042, KBP-089 and KBP-056.

KeyBioscience has currently initiated its Phase II development with KBP-042.

Eli Lilly Diabetes and Eli Lilly US president Enrique Conterno said: “This is an exciting opportunity. Our strategic collaboration with KeyBioscience will open the door to a potentially innovative treatment approach for people with type 2 diabetes and, possibly, other metabolic conditions.”

Under the deal, KeyBioscience will provide Eli Lilly with the global rights to develop and commercialise these molecules, for which Nordic Bioscience subsidiary will receive an initial payment of $55m.

"We are extremely excited about the promise of this new mechanism, which could potentially improve insulin sensitivity, reduce weight and improve blood glucose control."

KeyBioscience will also be eligible for additional potential development, regulatory, and commercialisation milestones, in addition to tiered royalty payments on future sales.

KeyBioscience Board chairman Morten Karsdal said: “We are extremely excited about the promise of this new mechanism, which could potentially improve insulin sensitivity, reduce weight and improve blood glucose control.

“The dual activation of the calcitonin and amylin receptors is exciting research in the diabetes space. We look forward to partnering with Lilly to advance this important work.”

The dual activation of calcitonin and amylin receptors is believed to enhance insulin sensitivity, reduce food intake and fat deposition, improve blood glucose levels, and result in weight reduction.

The existing therapies available to treat type 2 diabetes include insulins, oral treatments, and non-insulin injectables.