Seattle Genetics exercises option to co-develop tisotumab vedotin for solid tumours


Danish biotechnology company Genmab and US-based Seattle Genetics are set to co-develop tisotumab vedotin for the treatment of patients with solid tumours.

Tisotumab vedotin is an ADC composed of a human antibody that binds to TF, which is a protein involved in tumour signalling and angiogenesis, and Seattle Genetics' ADC technology that uses a cleavable linker and the cytotoxic drug monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE).

The therapy is currently being studied in Phase I / II clinical trials for solid tumours.

The development follows after Seattle Genetics exercised its option to co-develop the treatment under a commercial licence and collaboration agreement that was originally signed in October 2011.

"Our ADC partnership with Genmab has generated promising Phase I / II data for tisotumab vedotin in patients with recurrent cervical cancer."

Under the deal, Genmab was given rights to use Seattle Genetics’ antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) technology with its HuMax-tissue factor (TF) antibody.

In addition, Seattle Genetics was granted rights to exercise a co-development and co-commercialisation option at the end of the Phase I clinical development for tisotumab vedotin.

Seattle Genetics president and chief executive officer Dr Clay Siegall said: “Our ADC partnership with Genmab has generated promising Phase I / II data for tisotumab vedotin in patients with recurrent cervical cancer.

“As Seattle Genetics opts into co-development of this clinical programme, we add another potential product to our strong pipeline. Together with Genmab, we look forward to advancing tisotumab vedotin for the treatment of solid tumours.”

The two companies will also share half of all future costs and profits for tisotumab vedotin.