GSK finalises agreement with Brazilian MoH for Tivicay supply


GSK has finalised an agreement with the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH) for the supply of Tivicay (dolutegravir).

The latest deal follows the announcement made by MoH on 28 September this year that the medicine would be made available to people living with HIV (PLHIV), beginning January next year.

Under the agreement, ViiV Healthcare, which is majority owned by GSK, will provide the MoH with about 1.3 million packs of dolutegravir 50mg tablets next year, to be prescribed to about 100,000 PLHIV in Brazil.

ViiV Healthcare vice-president Jacopo Andreose said: “This agreement with the Brazilian Ministry of Health represents another important milestone in our commitment to ensure more options for HIV treatments are available for patients in countries where there is significant need.

“An agreement on this scale truly showcases our ability as a company to deliver on our promise to accelerate access to innovative HIV treatments all over the world.”

ViiV Healthcare’s decision to make dolutegravir available on the national health programme in Brazil is part of its strategy to partner with governments to promote broad access to the medicine to those in need.

UNAIDS noted that Brazil has the highest prevalence of HIV in Latin America, with 47% of the estimated 1.6 million PLHIV in the region living in Brazil.

"An agreement on this scale truly showcases our ability as a company to deliver on our promise to accelerate access to innovative HIV treatments all over the world."

According to the MoH, 48,000 new patients initiated HIV treatment this year.

Dolutegravir (Tivicay) is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI) used in combination with other anti-retroviral agents for the treatment of HIV.

By preventing the viral DNA from integrating into the genetic material of human immune cells, integrase inhibitors block HIV replication.

Tivicay is approved in more than 90 countries across North America, Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa and Latin America.


Image: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Photo: courtesy of C. Goldsmith/Wikipedia.