Cell-engineering company MaxCyte has signed a strategic platform licence (SPL) with biotechnology company Catamaran Bio to support the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-NK cell therapy programmes.

Under the deal, Catamaran will get non-exclusive clinical and commercial rights to use MaxCyte’s Flow Electroporation technology and the ExPERT platform, for which the latter will receive platform licensing fees and programme-related revenue.

The company is currently leveraging synthetic biology and non-viral cell engineering to develop cryopreserved CAR-NK cell therapies that can treat challenging cancers such as solid tumours.

These CAR-NK cell therapies combine new functional attributes with the NK cells’ inherent cancer-fighting properties.

Catamaran has developed its TAILWIND platform, an integrated suite of technologies designed for expanding, engineering, and processing NK cells into safe and effective, off-the-shelf cell therapy products to treat different types of cancer.

MaxCyte president and CEO Doug Doerfler said: “The ability to leverage synthetic biology to engineer cell therapies will help drive innovative solutions for solid tumour cancer treatment.

“At MaxCyte, we are passionate about driving the discovery, development and manufacturing of next-generation, cell-based medicines to tackle complex diseases and cancer.

“We are excited to support Catamaran with the advancement of their pipeline of differentiated CAR-NK cell therapies into and through the clinic.”

The company claims that its ExPERT instrument portfolio represents the next generation of the industry’s clinically validated electroporation technology for scalable cellular engineering.

The ExPERT platform offers the high-end performance that is needed for the next wave of cellular and biological therapeutics. It provides high transfection efficiency with enhanced functionality.

Cell & Gene Therapy coverage on Pharmaceutical Technology is supported by Cytiva.

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