ALCMI, ALCF and Scancell partner to evaluate SCIB2 cancer vaccine for NSCLC

30 January 2017 (Last Updated January 30th, 2017 18:30)

The Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute (ALCMI) and the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF) have collaborated with UK-based Scancell to assess SCIB2 cancer vaccine to treat patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

ALCMI, ALCF and Scancell partner to evaluate SCIB2 cancer vaccine for NSCLC

The Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute (ALCMI) and the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation (ALCF) have collaborated with UK-based Scancell to assess SCIB2 cancer vaccine to treat patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

SCIB2 is Scancell's second ImmunoBody cancer vaccine platform currently under development. It stimulates the immune system to potentially treat and prevent cancer.

ALCMI president and chief operating officer Steven Young said: “This partnership enables us to access an important clinical programme that could also accelerate the development of this groundbreaking immunotherapy technology.”

Scancell has successfully completed a Phase I / II clinical trial with SCIB1 cancer vaccine by using it on patients suffering from melanoma.

ALCF chair and ALCMI founder Bonnie J. Addario said: “Combining our two foundations' unique resources will increase patient engagement with the goal to bring new treatment options to NSCLC patients.”

Lung cancer accounts for 27% of all cancer deaths, more than breast, prostate and colon cancer combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Along with having the ability to complement existing treatments, SCIB2 can also work in cases where current treatments either do not work or are not available.

"Combining our two foundations' unique resources will increase patient engagement with the goal to bring new treatment options to NSCLC patients."

SCIB2 stimulates immune responses to specific lung cancer antigens that help the vaccine to support the body in targeting and fighting NSCLC, thereby achieving longer survival rates.

Scancell CEO Richard Goodfellow said: “We have generated preclinical data that suggests that SCIB2 could be the ideal complement to existing and emerging checkpoint inhibitor therapies to treat NSCLC and so provide an effective new potential treatment option for patients with this devastating disease.”

ALCMI aims to support the UK company in the design and development of a Phase I / II clinical trial with SCIB2 cancer vaccine in patients suffering from NSCLC.

The clinical trial is expected to commence next year and will take nearly 18 months to complete.


Image: Micrograph of a squamous carcinoma, a type of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Photo: courtesy of Nephron / Wikipedia.