Aradigm has secured a small business initiative research (SBIR) grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

The two-year grant will be used by the company to investigate the treatment of two pulmonary non-tuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) infections with its inhaled liposomal ciprofloxacin products.

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Aradigm’s Linhaliq and Lipoquin products will be evaluated to investigate the treatment of PNTM infections, mycobacterium avium (M. avium) and mycobacterium abscessus.

PNTM infections are common in patients with other chronic lung conditions, such as cystic fibrosis and emphysema.

Oregon State University, Corvallis professor and the laboratory research lead Luiz Bermudez said: “Pulmonary infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have become a serious growing public health problem in the US and many other countries as they can result in debilitating lung disease and are costly to treat.

"We have shown that lung-delivered liposomal ciprofloxacin is effective in in-vitro and animal models of NTM without causing the emergence of resistant NTM."

“We have shown that lung-delivered liposomal ciprofloxacin is effective in in-vitro and animal models of NTM without causing the emergence of resistant NTM.

“Patients with NTM at present typically have to use several antibiotics to avoid the emergence of resistance. This NIH grant is important as it enables us to compare the benefits of lung-delivered liposomal ciprofloxacin alone or in combination with other antibiotics.”

For M. avium complex infection, the efficacy of the two Aradigm products will be tested in combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol and amikacin using macrophage and biofilm test systems, as well as a mouse lung infection.

For M. abscessus infection, the efficacy of Linhaliq and Lipoquin will be tested in combination with linezolid and imipenem.

The approximately $972,000 Phase II SBIR grant builds upon the results demonstrated in the Phase I SBIR grant.