Janssen launches new research platforms to focus on healthcare

12 February 2015 (Last Updated February 12th, 2015 18:30)

Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Research & Development has launched three new research platforms, which will focus on the areas, including disease prevention, disease interception, and microbiome.

Janssen

Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Research & Development has launched three new research platforms, which will focus on the areas, including disease prevention, disease interception, and microbiome.

The new research platforms include Janssen Prevention Centre (JPC), Disease Interception Accelerator (DIA) and Janssen Human Microbiome Institute (JHMI).

Janssen Research & Development global head William Hait said: "By advancing science in these areas, our new research platforms will strive to deliver the next-generation of transformational medical innovation.

"We believe the positive impact on people, communities, governments, medicine and the global economy will be dramatic and far-reaching."

The Janssen Prevention Centre (JPC) will concentrate to prevent chronic and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as Alzheimer's, heart disease, cancer and autoimmune diseases.

With headquarters in the Netherlands and laboratories in Leiden of Netherlands and La Jolla of US, JPC will use the vaccine discovery expertise and capabilities of the former Crucell Vaccine Institute, a group formed in 2011 following the acquisition of Crucell by Johnson & Johnson.

"By advancing science in these areas, our new research platforms will strive to deliver the next-generation of transformational medical innovation."

Based in the US, the Disease Interception Accelerator (DIA) is an incubator-like group, which will work on the root causes of diseases.

The DIA will concentrate on understanding disease susceptibility, risk assessment and tackle the origins of disease such as genetic predisposition, environmental exposure and phenotypic alterations.

The Janssen Human Microbiome Institute (JHMI) will concentrate on gaining a better understanding on the microbiome, which is increasingly recognised to play a crucial role in human health.

The JHMI will create external collaborations through anchor research centres in the Cambridge of US and Beerse of Belgium.

Janssen Human Microbiome Institute global head Dr Dirk Gevers said: "Through cutting-edge research and a global collaborative network, we aim to translate the science of the microbiome into therapeutic targets and diagnostic capabilities that have the potential to transform human health."


Image: A normal brain on the left, with a brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease on the right. Photo: courtesy of Garrondo.