UK’s NICE recommends Bayer’s Eylea for adults with visual impairment

28 September 2016 (Last Updated September 28th, 2016 18:30)

The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended Bayer’s Eylea (aflibercept solution for injection) as a first-line treatment option for adults with visual impairment due to macular oedema, secondary to branch vein occlusion (BRVO).

The UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended Bayer’s Eylea (aflibercept solution for injection) as a first-line treatment option for adults with visual impairment due to macular oedema, secondary to branch vein occlusion (BRVO).

A blood clot in one of the branches of the retina's main vein in the retina causes BRVO.

Due to blockages in the retinal veins, the pressure in the small blood vessels at the back of the eye increases and leads to blood and fluid leaking beneath the macula.

If not treated well, macular oedema can impact a person’s vision.

"We are pleased that NICE has finalised its positive decision for Eylea for the treatment of visual impairment due to macular oedema secondary to BRVO."

NICE also concluded that the treatment is clinically effective when given prior to laser photocoagulation.

With this positive decision in place, more than 13,000 patients will have first-line access to an anti-VEGF treatment that has been proven to achieve improvements in vision.

Bayer UK / Ireland CEO Dr Alexander Moscho said: “We are pleased that NICE has finalised its positive decision for Eylea for the treatment of visual impairment due to macular oedema secondary to BRVO.

“This treatment continues to achieve positive results in real-life clinical practice, similar to those demonstrated in clinical trials, and we hope that this will continue for patients with macular oedema secondary to BRVO.”

The anti-VEGF targeted treatment aflibercept is licensed in the UK for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) visual impairment due to macular oedema and BRVO.

Moorfields Eye Hospital consultant ophthalmologist professor Sobha Sivaprasad said: “I am pleased that NICE has finalised this guidance for aflibercept, since I am now able to offer an anti-VEGF as a first-line treatment option to patients with BRVO.

“This will allow patients to achieve the best possible clinical outcomes upon diagnosis and the opportunity to achieve the positive visual outcomes that we see in real-life clinical practice across other retinal conditions.”