Ritter and UBC to study role of microbiome and RP-G28 in environmental enteropathy

14 February 2017 (Last Updated February 14th, 2017 18:30)

Ritter Pharmaceuticals has partnered with the University of British Columbia (UBC)’s Michael Smith Laboratories in Canada to explore development of microbiome and RP-G28 in environmental enteropathy (EE).

Ritter Pharmaceuticals has partnered with the University of British Columbia (UBC)’s Michael Smith Laboratories in Canada to explore development of microbiome and RP-G28 in environmental enteropathy (EE).

As part of the collaboration, Ritter is providing its lead compound RP-G28 for use in the study and UBC microbiologist Dr B Brett Finlay will explore the microbiome’s role in EE. 

The latest pre-clinical research has been designed to build upon Dr Finlay’s studies that were previously published, demonstrating the gut microbiome’s role in contributing to the causes of EE. 

Ritter Pharmaceuticals co-founder and president Andrew Ritter said: “We are pleased to be collaborating with Dr Finlay and his team to better understand therapeutic interventions that may reverse signs of environmental enteropathy, a significant worldwide health issue. 

"Testing RP-G28 in the relevant model will greatly facilitate preclinical testing of this compound for affecting the outcome of EE."

“We’re excited to apply our clinical knowledge of RP-G28 in a way that has significant possibilities to produce substantial social benefits in developing countries.”

At present, RP-G28 is in a Phase IIb/3 study in humans for the treatment of lactose intolerance and has demonstrated beneficial changes to the gut microbiome in earlier studies.

Dr Finlay said: “We are pleased to be working with Ritter Pharmaceuticals to explore potential treatments and therapies to environmental enteropathy that affects so many of the world’s children. 

“Testing RP-G28 in the relevant model will greatly facilitate preclinical testing of this compound for affecting the outcome of EE.”

Ritter’s RP-G28 has the potential to become the first FDA-approved treatment for lactose intolerance, a condition that affects people worldwide.