Texas A&M University System and iBio to develop plant-produced pharmaceuticals

7 June 2016 (Last Updated June 7th, 2016 18:30)

The Texas A&M University System (TAMUS) has entered into a joint development agreement with US-based medical supply store iBio and its subsidiary iBio CMO, in order to develop a collaborative programme in plant-produced pharmaceuticals.

The Texas A&M University System (TAMUS) has entered into a joint development agreement with US-based medical supply store iBio and its subsidiary iBio CMO, in order to develop a collaborative programme in plant-produced pharmaceuticals.

TAMUS includes Texas A&M University AgriLife Research and Texas A&M Institute of Infectious Animal Diseases (IIAD).

The partnership will help strengthen the research and development resources of TAMUS with the commercial therapeutics, as well as vaccine development, along with manufacturing capabilities of iBio.

The partnership aims at developing and testing commercial, cost-effective, therapeutic and vaccine solutions against diseases that threaten both humans and animals.

"The partnership aims at developing and testing commercial, cost-effective, therapeutic and vaccine solutions against diseases that threaten both humans and animals."

Over the last six years, the iBio CMO leadership team has worked in collaboration with TAMUS, with an aim to develop a bio-manufacturing ecosystem at Texas A&M.

The ecosystem included construction of the iBio facility, receiving the Centre for Innovation in Advanced Development and Manufacturing (CIADM) contract, and build out of a workforce development programme with The National Centre for Therapeutics Manufacturing (NCTM) at Texas A&M.

IIAD and iBio are already working together on therapeutic products for use in the treatment of infectious animal diseases.

In partnership with Brazil's Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), iBio is also developing a recombinant yellow fever vaccine based on its technology.

The company is additionally developing proprietary products to treat fibrotic diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, systemic sclerosis, and scleroderma.